HOUSING & DEVELOPMENT

As Portland’s national reputation draws new residents, development and higher housing prices, you want more good, affordable housing to meet our residents’ needs and those of our children while retaining the human scale of our attractive city. We’ll listen to you and advocate for policies and projects that meet those challenges.

We’re proud of our impacts on Midtown & Portland

Keep Portland Livable has demonstrated that you can fight City Hall successfully.

Keep Portland Livable has demonstrated that you can fight City Hall successfully.

Now that the Federated Companies have agreed to buy the 3-1/2 acres in Bayside to build Midtown, we of Keep Portland Livable can look back with pride at our accomplishments over the past 3-1/2 years.

First and foremost, we are the only group inside or outside City Hall to have altered this project in any meaningful way. During 18 months of hearings, the Continue Reading →

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Worried about city housing costs? You’re too late!

New market-rate housing such as Federated's Midtown will create more demand for middle-class service providers and for the existing units they occupy, raising their rents.

New market-rate housing such as Federated’s Midtown will create more demand for middle-class service providers and for the existing units they occupy, raising their rents.

Sorry, folks, despite what you think and what you’ve heard, Portland’s future does not reside in more housing. It will be found in more jobs.

New high-paying jobs downtown.Or the lack of new high-paying jobs downtown.

Our fair city will take one of those two paths—one paved with newly created, family-supporting jobs generated by innovation or the one cobbled together out of low-paying service jobs­. Continue Reading →

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Revised Midtown will be built in the next two years

One of three apartment buildings that will be built along Somerset Street starting this year.

One of three apartment buildings that will be built along Somerset Street starting this year.

It has been confirmed: Midtown’s 440 apartments — the largest single infusion of new Portland housing in decades — will be built in the Bayside neighborhood within the next two years as a result of the work of Keep Portland Livable and new leadership in City Hall.

If it had not been for Keep Portland Livable, a single tower with fewer than 180 apartments would have been built beside a parking garage on the same city-owned property, and then a wait-and-see game would have begun. Continue Reading →

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Portland Company highlights flawed planning process

The Portland Company Complex on the waterfront below Fore Street (Photo by Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald)

The Portland Company Complex on the waterfront below Fore Street (Photo by Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald)

This month, the Keep Portland Livable meeting from 5:00-6:30 pm Sept. 17 in Coffee by Design at 1 Diamond Street in East Bayside will feature a presentation by the Soul of Portland and its campaign to create a scenic view ordinance in Portland and to correct current failings in the zoning code.

The procedural problems include vagueness, loopholes, waivers, and staff overruling council directives. Continue Reading →

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Where are Portland and its housing headed?

In Portland, private developers are building primarily for people with incomes well above average.

In Portland, private developers are building primarily for people with incomes well above average.

City leaders are actively responding to a report they commissioned that lays out in stark detail by how much the city is failing to meet its affordable housing goals.

The report suggests Portland is at a tipping point that will determine whether the middle class remains in the city 10 years hence. That’s because those now focused on housing in the city are playing up to the rich or down to the poor, but not to the middle class. Continue Reading →

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Parking fewer cars is a key to Portland’s future

Photo: Mark Barnette

Research shows stretches of off-street surface parking deaden most critical elements of city vitality. Photo: Mark Barnette

If someone were to tell you that the future of Portland is tied to its willingness to restrict car storage downtown, would you believe her?

You should.

She’d be right.

Portland’s ability to grow its population and its tax base, the way the city will be redeveloped, the vibrancy of its street life, the number of new jobs and—especially—how much those new jobs will pay will all depend on what the city does about parking. Continue Reading →

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Can housing trickle down to Portland’s middle class?

High cost housing

Top prices for 29 luxury townhouses being built on Munjoy Hill were announced at $700,000, but rose to $800,000 before selling. Two thirds of the units are under contract awaiting completion in 2015.

There’s a theory abroad that’s permeating the corridors of City Hall and the editorial rooms of the local daily which suggests that any high-end housing is good housing because it will relieve demand down the line to lower cost housing, benefiting us all.

If true, that’s great news for our city councilors, because they can just let the market work its wonders on new, high-priced housing all over Munjoy Hill, Bayside, and the West End allowing us all to see rents and house prices decline, stabilize, or only inch upwards.

This theory is being touted across the country, as reflected in this article. Continue Reading →

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Ready or Not, Taller Buildings Are Coming Our Way

MD Plan. Thompsons Point. finalThose who doubt that the City Council is not all-out in favor of development of almost any density and any height might look back carefully at the week just past.

On Monday night (12/16), the City Council voted 9-0 to double the allowable building heights on one of the most visible properties in the city.  As a result, height limitations on Thompson’s Point jumped from 65 to 120 feet. The council also waived a density requirement that prevented the developers from exceeding 60 units per acre. Continue Reading →

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